Camila Salcedo

Camila Salcedo was born in Caracas, Venezuela. Has a Bachelor of Fine Arts Interdisciplinary from NSCAD University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is an artist, curator and community organizer who explores art-making via performance, video, and textiles. She makes art because she is interested in questioning systems and institutions created to define us such as nations, identities, politics, and migration. She has exhibited nationally in several galleries, artist-run centres and festivals.


Camila Salcedo was born in Caracas, Venezuela and immigrated to Toronto, Canada in 2007. She has a Bachelor of Fine Arts Interdisciplinary from NSCAD University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and graduated as the elected Valedictorian of the Class of 2018. 


She is an artist, curator and community organizer who explores art-making via performance, video, and textiles. She makes art because she is interested in questioning systems and institutions created to define us such as nations, identities, politics, and migration. 


She has exhibited nationally in several galleries, artist-run centres and festivals including Xpace Cultural Centre, Eyelevel Artist-Run Centre, articule, the Anna Leonowens Gallery, Nocturne Art at Night, Art in the Open, RiAP (Rencontre International d’Art Performance de Québec), the Khyber Centre for the Arts, among others, and internationally at Proyecto ‘ACE in Argentina, and at the Gallery of the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. 


She has completed multiple artist-residencies in Latin America through Arquetopia and The Lab Program in Mexico, Residencia Corazón and Proyecto ‘ACE in Argentina, and Arquetopia in Peru, and one in Halifax through Eyelevel Artist-Run Centre’sHeat Waves Mini-Residency. She is currently a Textile Studio Artist-in-Residence at Harbourfront Centre and is taking part in Sur Gallery’s Mentorship Program, both in Toronto, Canada.

Artist Statement

 I make art because I am interested in questioning systems and institutions created to define us such as nations, identities, politics, and migration. As a member of the Venezuelan Diaspora and as an immigrant to Canada, these questions are intrinsic to the ways in which I interact with the world. My art practice is rooted in interdisciplinary art-making primarily explored via performance, video, textiles, and curation, however, I do not limit myself to these mediums when another one is more apt for communicating the question I wish to ask with my work. I see art-making as a possible pathway to community-building, -care, and -healing, and the relationship between two people as a possible space of decolonization.